Research

My dissertation tells the story of norm diffusion using agent-based modeling and event history analysis. The theoretical models draw on insights from cultural evolution and complex adaptive systems.  By identifying the unique over-time patterns associated with four potential causal mechanism driving the diffusion processes, I predict which types of norms are apt to become globally relevant and the conditions under which states are likely to internalize new norms. I apply the model to two cases of norm diffusion, women's rights and personal integrity rights. I find that various institutions associated with these rights follow different patterns of diffusion.

You can find it here.

Articles:

Nieman, Mark David and Jonathan J. Ring. 2015. "The Construction of Human Rights: Accounting for Systematic Bias in Common Human Rights Measures." European Political Science. 14(4):473-495. 

Mitchell, Sara McLaughlin, Jonathan J. Ring, and Mary K. Spellman. 2013. "Domestic Legal Traditions and States' Human Rights Practices." Journal of Peace Research 50(2): 203-217. 
Replication Materials found here.